Black Forest Cupcakes


From the moment you bite into these black forest cupcakes you’re taken on a rich and indulgent journey. First you get the luscious, aromatic vanilla buttercream, followed by the light and bouncy chocolate cake, but wait, there’s a surprise in the middle. A silky and divine dark chocolate which hides a perfectly sweet cherry.

These cupcakes are ones nobody will be able to resist and they’re guaranteed to stick in everyones mind! Easy to make but super effective and fitting for this time of the year. The Christmas tree ontop gives them that festive flare and are surprisingly very easy to pipe!

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Black Forest Cupcakes

Luscious, aromatic vanilla buttercream, followed by light and bouncy chocolate cake, but wait, there's a surprise in the middle. A silky and divine dark chocolate which hides a perfectly sweet cherry

Course Cake
Prep Time 15 minutes
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 35 minutes
Servings 12 cupcakes
Author FentonEats

Ingredients

Chocolate Cupcakes

  • 140 g caster sugar
  • 100 g plain flour sifted
  • 40 g cocoa powder sifted
  • 40 g unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 120 ml milk whole
  • 1 egg
  • 1.5 tsp baking powder
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean, paste or extract

Ganache Filling & Cherry Middle

  • 12 cherries glace or stoned fresh
  • 75 g dark chocolate
  • 75 ml double cream

Vanilla Buttercream

  • 150 g unsalted butter
  • 500 g icing sugar sifted
  • 20 ml milk whole
  • 1 tbsp vanilla bean extract or paste can also be used
  • green colouring few drops
  • sprinkles

Instructions

Ganache

  1. Prepare the ganache first to give it enough time to cool. In a small pan heat the double cream until it begins to bubble, once it does, remove from the heat.

  2. Add the dark chocolate and continuously stir so the chocolate melts. Allow to cool whilst you make the cupcakes.

Chocolate Cupcakes

  1. Preheat the oven to 170°C/325°F/gas mark 3 and prepare a cupcake tin with 12 paper/silicon cases

  2. Put the dry ingredients (flour, cocoa powder, sugar, baking powder and salt) and butter into a bowl and with an electric mixer or elbow grease beat/mix until everything is combined and the mixture has a breadcrumb consistency

  3. In a separate bowl whisk the wet ingredients (milk, egg, vanilla)

  4. Slowly pour half of the wet mixture into the dry mixture and beat to combine, making sure that all lumps have gone

  5. Reduce the speed of the mixture and add the remaining wet mixture and mix until the fully combined

  6. Spoon the mixture into the cupcake cases til about 2/3 full and bake for 15-20 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean. Leave the cupcakes to cool in the tray before turning out onto a wire rack

  7. Once the cupcakes are cool, using a tsp or a cupcake corer (think thats the technical term..) cut out a little hole in the middle, deep enough to fit one cherry.

  8. Add the cherry into the middle of the cupcake and with the cooled ganache fill in the hole until you reach the top - don't overfill as you don't want spillage

Vanilla Buttercream

  1. Beat the butter in a mixer until pale and airy.

  2. Add half the icing and use a fork to help blend it in a bit and half of the milk - this helps reduce the icing cloud that'll cover your kitchen

  3. Add the rest of the icing, milk, vanilla and cinnamon and keep mixing until really white in colour. Adjust quantities of icing to milk as required for your desired consistency

  4. Split the icing - start with half and half, you'll likely need more green than white, but you can add more white to green but not the other way around. Colour one half with a few drops of green food colouring

  5. Spread the white icing ontop of the cupcakes to form a covering over the ganache and then sprinkle with the white "snow" sprinkles if you have some. No need for neatness here, it's snow!

  6. Pipe the trees ontop using the techniques shown on the blog above and then pop a little star ontop

Recipe Notes

To pipe the Christmas trees this guide will help you choose the right nozzle and technique - Lydia Bakes

For the icing - I always make more than less - icing can be frozen and lasts in the fridge quite a while so making more won't do any harm, especially as we all ice differently! I also prefer to use less butter and more milk as a "loosener", if the mix is too stiff, add a dash more milk, if it becomes too loose and runny, a couple of spoonfuls of icing

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